Starting a Recovery Mini-Series!

Over the next few days, I’ll be continuing to build out one of the other essential pieces for the Athletic Time Machine site— RECOVERY!  If you want to race and train like a younger athlete, you have to recover like one.

I’ll be adding three posts with less-known tricks I use to enhance recovery.  Of course, all this will be archived on the site and also summarized under the Enter the Time Machine section of the site.

Thanks for reading and be sure to like the Athletic Time Machine Facebook page or follow this site to keep up-to-date with the latest.

The Joys of Running Super Slow

Right now, I’m in a cycling build.  But that means that I still run easily just about every day.  Perhaps “easy” is an overstatement– these runs are positively lackadaisical.  I think my pace topped out at about 12:00 or 13:00 a mile (which is almost half my running pace in a 10K race).  All of this is fine by me because I’ve learned how to run slow to great effect.

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Supercompensation and Timing of Training Effects

A few days back, I had a marathon weekend racing Duathlon Nationals and Seafair.  The next day (Monday), I was curled up in a fetal position on the couch and occasionally making cow-like sounds (memo to self: take such days as vacation or sick days).  I felt only slightly better on Tuesday.  A moderately hard (but failed) workout on Wednesday and an easy day on Thursday… maybe finally I’m ready to hit a hard workout.  And so that workout would be 2 x 30min at FTP or higher with 5min recovery.  I rode this one with my friend Mary.  Time escaped us and I was only able to get one effort in, but it was both comfortable and 10 watts higher than it should have been.  If I raced with this much energy on the weekend, I would have been unstoppable.  Obviously, at least for that day, anaerobic threshold (AT) was not my limiter.

So what’s going on here?  Simple, it’s just basic training effects and supercompensation.  According to Pete Pfitzinger, there are some basic rules to the timing of training effects. The bottom line is:

  • It takes 8-10 days to get benefits from any workout
  • It takes 8-10 days to recover from a maxVO2 workout
  • It takes 4 days to recover from lactate threshold and tempo workouts
  • Recovering from long runs takes the longest time

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